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· 5 min read
Nikita Melkozerov

Hello folks! A few months ago, we released Resoto Notebook, a library that makes it easy to query, visualize, and analyze Resoto data using pandas, Plotly, and Jupyter Notebooks.

Today, we'll discuss Resoto's new JupyterLite support, which allows you to use Notebooks in the browser without installing or launching a Jupyter server.

Want to analyze raw infrastructure data when only platform engineers can access cloud consoles? Or count infrastructure assets without a data scientist? JupyterLite is a JupyterLab distribution that runs entirely in a web browser, and Resoto's JupyterLite support gives you access to popular data analysis tools without the need for any additional installation steps.

· 27 min read
Lukas Lösche

In Actionable Cloud Infrastructure Metrics, we explored how to create metrics, export them into a time series database, and visualize them with Grafana. Today, we'll take a look at how to build a web app using Streamlit, a framework that turns data into web apps.

Sheep looking inside a black box

If you are not familiar with Python, don't worry—we're going to keep it simple! In Prerequisites, we'll go over installing Python and the coding techniques utilized in this project.

· 7 min read
Anja Freihube

Software engineers working with AWS have every cloud service imaginable at their fingertips, and developer velocity could hardly be higher. But, even the most shiny of coins has two sides.

While developers can freely spin up compute instances and databases in addition to less tangible things like Lambda functions or virtual identities—at some point, someone will ask, "What is all of this?"

And as that person hacks away in the CLI trying to get an overview of resources spanning multiple AWS accounts, they will inevitably get frustrated.

While Amazon has been a pioneer in cloud computing and offers the largest array of services, there are some things that just aren't so ideal. Namely, API consistency.

In this post, I describe a few of the challenges and quirks with the AWS API and why we're building Resoto. (Spoiler alert: It is so that you don't have to!)

· 10 min read
Matthias Veit

Today's world of cloud computing is complex. There are many cloud providers, each with their own set of services. Getting insights out of your infrastructure requires specialized understanding of the data from each service.

Cloud Service Diversity

Properties in different services may have different names but the same meaning, or vice versa. To interpret properties, we need to ensure that values have a defined unit of measurement and one base unit. You can see the challenge if you imagine the many ways you can specify the size of a volume, the number of CPU cores, or even timestamps.

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